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the parched lands of the sahel and congo, technology is transforming things. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. now, if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment. this feeling reminds me a little bit, maybe more than a little bit of the arrival of punk rock in the mid 1970's. you see, the clash were the very base of the rock and roll pyramid and overnight gave the finger to the dreadful business, the lurgy at the time that was at the top of the pyramid. it was called progressive rock. epic lyrics, no hooks, no -- great reviews. [laughter] punk bands made no reference of being worthy of the audience. if you want to play, great, grab a guitar and you're in. the clash were like a public service announcement with guitars, and they gave youtube the idea that social activism could make for a very musical riot. so i'd just like to point out that none of your professors, not a single one, not ever has ever drawn or is likely to draw the connection between the arab spring and the clash. just a little intermission. [applause] and ok. sharpen your pencils. i
in the cyberworld. technology drives everything we do the world wide web has made us more interconnected than at any time in our human history. the vast majority of our emperor structure resides in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure in the united states reside in the private sector. the national security risks and economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with all of our partners. our partners of the private sector. for those, but the work of the government or private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desired is. this private sector holds a lot of data. these assets are pretty profound. their protection to the united states priorities is of national importance. the president declared recently, and i quote, here is a list of priorities, this is in the top five. the cyber threat is one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face as a nation and america's economic prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cyber security.
but fundamentally it's an empowering technology for these people especially the young people who are trying to find a way to build a better life and broad band can be an enabler there. so from a philosophic perspective we've been trying to direct some of our efforts that way as well. but from a pricing per specive we're trying to make it as affordable as possible. >> cost is one deterrent. is lack of a computer? >> i think that's absolutely an issue, access to computers for young people in the home is a real issue. in some homes in urban poor areas, they don't have the digital literacy that you talk about and that's a broader issue. we've been working on more on a state by state basis within wind stream. the u.s.t.a. has been involved in that on how we might help there but i think we've got a lot of work to do there. >> what about whit comes to mobile broad band is that included in the access america plan? >> it is. i think that one of the mobile brondsband going to play a big role as some of the large companies has rolled out services. the latest 4 g is improving the broad band capabilities. but i
with the international society for technology and education. the assessments are scheduled to be implemented in 2014. school districts will need to of grand broadband, make sure their kids can be successful. do you think that is enough of a pressure point? >> in idaho, and the voters voted to strike down the digital learning piece of the reform package to das2-1. it is a sign that the folks that are pushing for digital learning have a lot of work to do in terms of getting the public on board. >> i would say a regular survey of the policy elite in washington published its. we have questions about this. there is a big concern about the ability of them to meet the challenges that have been laid out for them. there are concerns about technology. you said it is a pressure point. i think it is potentially a friction point. you're going to see more of that. i think states can use this as more opportunity to back out. >> in terms of more federal money, people said to us live all been talking about how there is a big squeeze. and 11 people feel like the money the department provided was not enough. there nee
and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
the latest and greatest technology. they called it a 10:00 fire, meaning it would be beat by 10:00 the next morge. finally the wind shifted direction and they found themselves running up this hill for dear life. the leader of this group lit a match and he burned the area around them, this way when the fire came and over-took him, he would be safe, and he -- it is now known as a safe fire. he called for his men to come and join him. he remained unharmed in his escape fire, and they all died. it is a metaphor that we are all running up the hill sticking to the status quo when the answer is right here in front of us. >> here is another couple people we see right here in front of us. the former journalist sharon brownly and dr. lesley cho. why did you pick her as a spokesperson? >> she has written a book called "over-treated." that book was sort of seminole for us in understanding that more is not better when it comes to health care, that more can actually hurt us. it was her book that really explained that to us. and therefore i saw her out to be in our film. >> the vast majority of physicians
phone. across the parched land of the dense rain forests of the congo. technology is transforming things. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment, this reminds me of the arrival of punk rock in the mid- 70's. the clash was the very base of the rock-and-roll pyramid. overnight they gave the finger to be dreadful business that was at the top of the pyramid. it was called progressive rock. epix song, know the lyrics. great reviews. -- epic songs, no good lyrics. great reviews. but the band made no pretense of being better than the audience appeared they were the audience. virtuosity was out. the clash were like a public- service announcement with the cars. -- guitars. they gave u2 the idea that social activism could make for a good social right. i would like to point out none of your professors as ever draw the connection between the arab spring and the clash. [applause] [laughter] little intermission. ok. sharpen your pencils. i do not need to lecture you about change of the air you breathe. you are in it. i thin
will take money from the airline industry that would otherwise be invested in nextgen technologies and the purchase of new aircraft, two proven methods for improving environmental performance and for reducing emissions. airlines for america and air transport trade association testified before our aviation subcommittee last year that the extraction of capital from the aviation system as enadviceaged under the e.u.'s emission trading scheme could threaten over 78,000 american jobs. this is unacceptable. but despite serious legal issues and ons -- objections by the international community, the european union is pressing ahead with its plans. in september, 2012, 21 countries, including the united states, signed a joint declaration against the e.u. emissions trading scheme in new delhi, india. the last year there have been several other multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illeg
and for the information technology revolution which has been among the drivers of educational change in the last 15 to 20 years. it has been like a runaway train. one response to the higher education funding crisis has been increased appeals, especially from legislators and business leaders for higher education to increase online education. the hope is that more students will receive college degrees faster and at less cost. research shows that done appropriately, the application of technologies can improve learning outcomes and decrease the cost of delivering that education. they say things have proven elusive. massive, open online courses are testing the market. universities now offer these class's prompting airlines like college may never be the same. stay tuned. it could be a wild ride. good ideas take time than research to explore. penn state operates a world campus with nearly 12,000 students enrolled in fully on line programs. our model has been honored by the sloan contortion as the top online program for 2012. it continues to be bald. in the coming year, we must prepare consent for the next gener
this wonderful he roik world saving effort to mobile lies technology and radar and all number of inventions and the atomic boc and we -- bomb and we need to bring that effort to the civilian front including medical care. and that document became sort of the founding agenda document for the whole post war effort, purely bipartisan, to put the curve sending from science front and center in the national policy. and i think it's been unfortunate that emphasis has fallen off of the national agenda over the last few years and i think we've all paid a price for it in terms of our own health and in terms of future cost of medical programs. and now i'm optimistic we can find a way to get it back on the agenda in this second term. >> if you look in a document that doesn't get any attention but it published from the executive office of the president there is a call there for medical drugs doubling. i think that's a political appropriate approach to take and i hope that frankly both parties take it up in the next four years. >> so jim has just put a serious policy issue on the table. this environment w
were dropped in to fight this fire. filled with the latest and greatest technology. and through this hubris they called it a 10:00 fire. to be beat by 10:00 the next morning. suddenly the wind shifted direction and they found themselves running up this hill for dear life and the leader of this group lit a match, he burned the area around him so when the fire came and overtook him he would be safe in whatsdz now know what's now known as an escape fire. and he called for his men to join him and nobody did and they all kept running up the hill. they all died and he remained unharmed. and it's really this metaphor that our health care system is burning and we're all running up the hill sticking to the status quo where the answer is right here in front of us. >> here's another couple of people that we see a lot of in the documentary. the journalist -- former journalist sharon and dr. leslie chow. sharon bedroomly was -- shannon excuse me, was with u.s. news at one point. why did you pick her? >> she had written a book called overtreated. and that book was sort of seminal for us in un
that businesses are looking for right now. keeping this country at the forefront of research, technology, and clean energy, putting people back to work rebuilding roads, bridges and schools and reducing our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. on this last item, we face a very clear deadline. that requires us to make some big decisions on jobs, taxes, and deficits by the end of the year. both parties voted to set this deadline. and i believe that both parties can work together to make these decisions in a balanced and responsible way. yesterday, i had a chance to meet with labor and civic leaders for their input. today i meet with c.e.o.'s of some of america's largest companies. and i'll meet with leaders of both party of congress before the week is out because there's only one way to solve the channels and that is to do it together. as i've said before, i'm open to compromise and i'm hope to new ideas. and i've been encouraged over the last week to hear republican after republican agree on the need for more revenue from the wealthiest americans as part of our arithmetic if we're s
? >> they don't do that. the airplane, modern technology, there was no cell phones, fax machines. there were type writers. that's a lot of it. they don't socialize. the reason joe and i could work together, i him and joe and i knew his wife. i wouldn't do anything mean to joe. that's a lot of it. the times have changed so much. in the senate, one of the problems is they got away from regular order. regular order. that sounds like a washington term. what it means is you send a bill to a committee, you have a hearing, you have oversight hearings, you mark up a bill, you have amendments, you vote, you go to the full committee, you go to the senate, you go to the house, you go to conference, you send a bill to the president and he signs it or vetoes it. they don't do that anymore. even the transportation bill, which they finally got done this year, went through an extraordinary procedure really because the house never passed the bill. but they wound up getting a transportation bill. so it's a combination of things. it's modern technology. frankly it is the 24/7 news media. you make a mistake, yo
top technology companies, are asking us to preserve education and r&d, which is the bedrock of innovation and competitiveness. and this week, even the u.s. chamber of commerce said it was opened to a compromise that included revenue. these are the constructive voices i hope my colleagues listen to as we approach negotiations on the fiscal cliff. politics is the art of compromise, and working together we can reduce our nation's deficit and preserve strategic investments in those programs that fuel economic growth and competitiveness. even in the midst of the civil war, president lincoln and the 38th congress authorized the transcontinental railroad, the homestead act and the land grant college and university system. they understood we had to invest in the future while also dealing with the crisis of the present. no doubt we all have something to lose if we do not succeed. so perhaps by each of us giving a little we can revive this economic recovery, restore faith in our ability to govern responsible low and deliver on that mandate we just got last week from the voters. i yiel
is a global leader in research and technology and clean energy, which will attract new companies and high- wage jobs for america. it is a plan put americans back to work, including veterans, rebuilding our infrastructure, and it is a plan to reduce our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. our work is made that much more urgent because at the end of this year we face a series of deadlines that require us to make major decisions about how to pay our deficit down, decisions that will have a huge impact on economies and the middle class, both now and in the future. last year i worked with democrats and republicans to cut $1 trillion in spending that we could not afford. i intend to work with both parties to do more, and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen the programs like medicaid and medicare for the long haul. but as i have said before, we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. if we are serious about reducing the deficit, we have to combine spending cuts with revenue, and that means asking the wealthiest americans to pay a l
to beat our behinds in november. they were investing in technology and infrastructure and a ground game that was beyond 21st century. their ability to identify their voter even when that voter looked like our voter. thing the interesting that your statistics are showing folks who looked like a republican voter turned out to be an obama voter because they identified them, worked them and got them to the polls. host: blake is on the phone on the republican line in alabama. caller: \[indiscernible] they were able to vote in south because of grand old party, the way sehe talks. that was a long long time ago i guess. i see first of all -- i was curious about a couple of numbers but before i get to that just a quick point about the money that people are talking about, how much money, that money made no difference and it seems like money made all the difference. in the summer romney had no money and obama was savaging him and he could not respond. and he was -- as a rich fellow who had account in cayman islands and didn't care about the people. he never responded because he had no money. money
have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the ground, we have remarkable staff and the campaign they put together is the best in history. the reason those people got involved is because they believed in barack obama. it was the relationship between them and our candidate. >> one last thing, we never thought of you guys as rooters. >> i think that is it. thank you all for joining us. this is our last conference call for the campaign. it has been a pleasure talking with you often, and i am sure we will have an opportunity to work together again. thanks. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
technology and other research capabilities that are out there where we can learn well ahead of a disaster, that it's coming, that we can then warn the citizens, take whatever precautions are necessary and whatever defense systems may be required. and so it's not just the disaster. it's the preparation. the early warning. the ability to know what may be coming to harm the citizens of this nation. and so as a congress we should be cognizant of the role that we play in providing the resources, the direction and the authorization for those agencies that are able to have the technologies to perceive, to understand what may be coming to the citizens of this nation and those around the world. secondly, as individuals it seems to me we ought to be paying attention, and when the authorities say it's time to leave we really ought to do that. i was the insurance commissioner and lieutenant governor in california and often found myself in situations where i had responsibilities along these lines and all too often and all too tragically, the citizens that were warned early they should leave because of
or six years. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think academia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con g
and technology and clean energy, which will attract new companies and high-wage jobs for america. it is a plan put americans back to work, including veterans, rebuilding our infrastructure, and it is a plan to reduce our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. our work is made that much more urgent because at the end of this year we face a series of deadlines that requires to make major decisions about how to pay our deficit down. decisions that will have a huge impact on economies and the middle class, both now and in the future. last year i work with democrats and republicans to cut $1 trillion in spending that we could not afford. i intend to work with both parties to do more, and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen the programs like medicaid and medicare for the long haul. but as i have said before, we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. if we are serious about reducing the deficit, we have the combined spending cuts with revenue, and that means asking the wealthiest americans to pay a little more in taxes. that is how we did
technology boom, the creation of private credit, and rapid increase in tax revenues. stephanie showed us something that was not a forecast at the time. those who were there in 2000 remember that the secretary of the treasury at the time and the chairman of the federal reserve were talking about a 13-year horizon for the complete elimination of the public debt. there was no forecast that the technology boom would come to an end, but it did. from 2000 onward, we were back into a more normal position of the government running substantial deficits as the private sector rebuild its financial position. that is the first point. long-term forecasts, the idea that one can control the future position of the debt and deficit by actions taken today, is an extremely tenuous and debatable idea. the second point is that there are certain assumptions being made which create extremely scary scenarios. those numbers that were shown -- in stephanie's presentation, the expectation that public debt would rise close to 200% of gdp by 2005. what is that based on? two important assumptions drive these projectio
. american technology, which opens up another topic of discussion, but a lot of it -- the concept is created in the u.s. and then it is put together there. our economies are intertwined. i think that on the question, globalization and all its implications are huge part of the political debate in this country. over jobs, over national security. this is the new reality. you cannot put nafta or globalization or the internet back in a box. it was not china, it would be india and countries in africa. it already is making products that are either american in concept or are just completely international products. host: scott, let me add this to the mix -- the reporter notes that this will presumably not be much appreciated by beijing. guest: burma is a place that china perceives as in its sphere of influence. particularly as a place to get the resources it needs. timber along the borders, oil. there has been a backlash inside burma which is why we saw political reform their last year which is the reason the president is going, against china. in the way it treats burma as it basically its backyard f
or whatever technology that reusing, that made all the difference because they could talk to more people. these are hundreds of thousands of door knocks and phone calls they were able to do. when you look at the exit polls, there are a couple of things beyond the changing face of the nation, it is the changing attitudes of the nation. wisconsin elected the nation's first openly lesbian center. gay marriage was approved in four states. marijuana will be legal in colorado. this is a country where people are becoming more socially liberal, while the republicans are doing this soul-searching between what type of social policies they want to promote. that tripped up a lot of senate candidates. this is where young voters are a big part of this demographic as well. they turned out in bigger numbers in 2012 than they did in 2008, despite her not being lower overall. studies show that if you get a person to vote for the same party at three major elections in a row, you have them for life. that was a big concern for the democrats in 2010 when the tea party movement started up and republicans were
investing in technology and infrastructure and a ground game that was beyond 21st century. their ability to identify their voter even when that voter looked like our voter. that's the interesting thing that your statistics are showing folks who looked like a republican voter turned out to be an obama voter because they identified them, worked them and got them to the polls. host: blake is on the phone on the republican line in alabama. caller: decirn [indiscernible] that was a long long time ago i guess. i see first of all -- i was curious about a couple of numbers but before i get to that just a quick point about the money that people are talking about, how much money, that money made no difference and it seems like money made all the difference. in the summer romney had no money and obama was savaging him and he could not respond. and he was -- as a rich fellow and didn't care about the people. he never responded because he had no money. money was the problem. but coming to the statistics what i'm curious what percentage of the total vote, not the democratic party, total vote was black
and the best teachers -- [applause] a country that lives up to its legacy as the global leader in technology and discovery and innovation, with all the good jobs and new businesses that follow. we want our children to live in an america that isn't burdened by debt, that isn't weakened by inequality, that isn't threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet. [applause] we want to pass on a country that's safe and respected and admired around the world, a nation that is defended by the strongest military on earth and the best troops this world has ever known -- [applause] but also a country that moves with confidence beyond this time of war to shape a peace that is built on the promise of freedom and dignity for every human being. we believe in a generous america, in a compassionate america, in a tolerant america, open to the dreams of an immigrant's daughter who studies in our schools and pledges to our flag. [applause] to the young boy on the south side of chicago who sees a life beyond the nearest street corner. [applause] to the furniture worker's child in north carolina who wants
the technology now to make this information available online -- almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. o2 dirt on the independent line -- we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggregate debt even more dart -- and aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: laura riding on twitter, -- in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic li
technology we talked about. it is how the reach people with a live? which for a lot a young people, they are online. idea.boadebroader the other side was effective in taking the comment that the missouri. >> yes, sir. >> senator, it seems to me the policies yet in the fight as may be needing change might have been the policies that were adopted as a necessity to get to the primaries. how do think the primary system can change to allow a candidate to come to that might represent the center right as opposed to the far right. how cannot be adjusted? >> and the democratic and republican side, there is a lot of talk about that. and to you go to a national primary -- until you go to a national primary, which no one is talking about, you will have this issue. there were some iowa republicans recently meeting same they had to be careful. we need to be careful. primaries are going to continue and be good to that process this go round. the president had no primary opponent and he was free to have a rose garden shed jeff burris. we cannot have that luxury. we have to go to this process. the r
it did after world war two to the economy in the 1960's. science, technology, everything grew. the economy boomed because we invested in people. that is what we need to do again. host: thank you. guest: i think growing the middle class is the key. a lot of these programs have helped to grow the middle class. a think social security helped grow the middle class. so many seniors have relied on social security, and it is not a gift. they worked for it. education -- when i ran for governor, in a middle-class area, 10% of college-aged kids were enrolled. now there are 50% that receive grants. that is not a gift that is something to help grow the middle class. host: jim, california. republican line. caller: $250,000 is not rich. the people on television betting for money, you should tax them. how much do you pay? the president and democrats suck up to these celebrities. they have to pay $40,000 to hang around the democrats. host: he says $250,000 and he criticized fund-raisers. guest: i think there is too much money in politics, and by the way, 80% of the $250,000 and above the inco
of the art oil spill prevention and response technologies, education research and training. and more than $1 billion will go to the united states coast guard trust fund to be available for clean up and coffer sation for those affected by oil spills in the gulf and throughout the united states. now as part of its guilty plea b.p. will retain a monitor for four years who will oversee safety and maintenance in regard to drilling in the gulf as well as an independent auditor who will conduct annual reviews to enshurep compliance with the terms of this agreement. the company will hire an ethics monitor to improve it's its conduct and foster robust cooperation with the government. now there can be no question that this historic announcement is a critical step forward and under scores the justice determination to stand with gulf coast communities. in february the settlement tote ling $90 million related to the company's clean water act liability for the deep water horizon disaster. and approximately $45 million of this total will go directly to the gulf in the form of penalties. but our work is far
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)